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MEG1 British Poetry December 2012
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Test Papers / Previous Question Papers of IGNOU MEG1 British Poetry December 2012


December 2012

MASTER'S DEGREE PROGRAMME IN ENGLISH

Term-End Examination

MEG-1 : BRITISH POETRY

Time : 3 hours
Maximum Marks : 100

Note : Explain ten passages below with reference to their contexts supplying brief critical comments where necessary.

1. Hir nose tretys, hir eyes greye as glas ; (10)
Hir mouth ful smal, and ther-to softe and reed ;
But sikerly she hadde a fair forheed ;
it was almost a spanne brood. I trowe ;
For, hardily, she was nat undergrowe.

OR

Sin thilke day that she was seven night old, (10)
That trewely she hath the herte in hold
Of Chauntecleer loken in every lith ;
He loved hir so, that wel was him therwith.

2. (a) And thou, glad Genius ! in whose gentle hand (10)
The bridale bowre and geniall bed remaine,
Without blemish or staine;
And the sweet pleasures of theyr loves delight
With secret ayde doest succour and supply,
Till they bring forth the fruitfull progeny,
Send us the timely fruit of this same night.

OR

(b) Nor Joue himselfe when he a swan would be 10
For love of Leda, whiter did appeare;
Yet Leda was they say as white as he
Yet not so white as these, nor nothing nerve:
So purely white they were.

3. (a) If they be two, they are two so 10
As stiffe twin compasses are two,
Thy, soule the fixt foot, makes no show
To move, but cloth, if the' other doe.

OR

(b) Of theeves and murderers; there I him espied, 10
Who straight, your suit is granted said,& died.

4. (a) Hence vain deluding joyes, 10
The brood of folly without father bred,
How little you bested
Or fill the fixed mind with all your, toyes;
Dwell in som idle brain,

OR

(b) Enow of such as, for their bellies' sakes 10
Creep and intrude, and climb into the fold

5. (a) All humane things are subject to decay, 10
And, when Fate summons, Monarchs must obey:

OR

(b) As yet a child, nor yet a fool to fame 10
I lisp'd in numbers, for the numbers, came

6. (a) In every cry of every Man, 10
In every infant's cry of fear,
In every voice, in every ban,
The mind-forged manacles I hear

OR

(b) O lady! We receive but what we give, 10
And in our life alone does Nature live !

7. (a) That what I thought was an old root which grew 10
To strange distortion out of the hill side,
Was indeed one of those deluded crew,

OR

(b) Upon the sodden ground 10
His old right hand lay nerveless, listless, dead,
Unceptred; and his realmless eyes were closed;
While his bow'd head seem'd list'ning to the Earth,
His ancient mother, for some comfort yet.

8. (a) And have I not saint Praned's ear to pray 10
Horses for ye, and brown Greek manuscripts,
And mistresses with great smooth manbly limbs ?

OR

(b) Yet each man kills the thing he loves, 10
By each let these be heard,
Some do it with a bitter look,
Some with a flattering word,

9. (a) The long-legged moov-hens dive, 10
And hens to moov-cocks call; Minute by
minute they live;
The stone's in the midst of all

OR

(b) These fragments I have shoved against my ruins 10
Why then lle fit you. Hieronymo's mad againe.

10. (a) And as I was green and carefree, 10
famous among the barns
About the happy yard and
singing as the farm was home,
In the sun that is young once only,
Time let me play and be
Golden in the mercy of his means,

OR

(b) A serious house on serious earth it is, 10
In whose blent air all our compulsions meet,
Are recognized,. and robed as destinies,
And that much can never be obsolete,

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